Diploma : Re-reading one-fifth of a fragment . 2 0 0 9

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Installation for im/possibility of a collective, media reading.
5 Films 16:9 HDV each 15 min 17 sec
5 flat screens turned 90° angle
5 wooden stands: each 70 cm × 2.30 m × 1.40 m
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The video films shown on turned screens are subdivided in five scenes. Each scene is composed of a moving image layer and statical text tables (citations). By playing the five films simultaneously, they become a visual unity. The films start and end in an abstract white space. Spoken language is only hearable in this white space; written language appears in a black space. This generates a clear division: Visible text is not read by a voice, the voice is not shown as written text. There is no movement of text such as text animation. The time limits for reading are not distinguishable for the readers of the films. This means that the readers are constantly confronted by the stress of volatile moments while reading.
The textual and visual content, the turned screens as well as the wooden stands are part of a conceived experiment: the first citation asks, if ›the book is incompatible with tele- technology‹. One of the last citation declares, that ›the book will be replaced by image and sound and that the quite private moment of reading has to yield an unlimited Hallraum.‹ [space of resonance]. In between these two extremities the test arrangement is set. It is the examination to construct the described ›Hallraum‹ and give a reference to a theoretical discourse of signs and writings at the same time. On one side there could be an additional benefit through the audiovisual contextualisation of written statements and on the other side it could lead to excessive demands and stimulus satiation. At any given time the reading viewer is part of the experiment as well as the researching authority and analyser of the possible results. The assumptions formulate themselves individually inside the head of the reader instead of being shown on the screens.